"The Hunger Games" Sugarcoats Tyranny for Kids

Hunger-Games-Capitol-Fashion.jpg

(left, the Satanic elite look like a friendly bunch)

The movie makes the New World Order look innocuous so we don’t have to worry about it.

by Marcos
(henrymakow.com)

A father who took his daughters to see “The Hunger Games” told me, “How can the movie be so evil, if the heroine fights the dictatorship?”

However, the globalists seldom make a mistake and, after seeing the movie, I believe there is a fact that explains the elite’s big bet on “The Hunger Games.”

The movie makes the new world order look weak and ridiculous, so we don’t have to worry about it.

Because of the internet, many people,
and especially the young, know much more about the new world order than
one generation ago. The Illuminati have to act, and nothing is more
efficient than making a real, dangerous enemy look stupid.

In
the first scene of the movie, we see an elite representative come to get the kids. She is dressed like a clown and talks like an
idiot. How can fear or drama develop when you have such a Bozo in charge?

Later, we see that the whole elite population dressed
like Willie Wonka, from the Chocolate Factory movie.

There is a guy with
blue hair and another one with a beard painted with ink. To make the
resemblance even better, the control room, with the employees all
dressed in white, reminds me of the Oompa Loompas in the TV room in
Wonka’s factory. The whole thing is designed to look ridiculous, not
scary or oppressive.

The movie delivers the message that girls
(the main target) should be aggressive and macho.

If they behave this
way, they can beat any challenges.

No mention that girls who behave this
way will have serious problems in marriage and the raising of their own
children, roles where femininity is crucial.

No mention that the movie
goers are sadistically enjoying the games in the same way the awful
elite in the movie is.

The violence in the movie is gratuitous.
Imagine in real world kids running for weapons and 6 to 8 kids being
stabbed to death in five minutes.

This would be a shock, a trauma for
life. Kids would probably start crying in despair and anguish. However,
in the movie, they are just cool about it and keep going, like mature
soldiers who have seen death a thousand times.

Video games are blamed
for desensitizing children regarding violence, but the whole atmosphere
of the movie is much more dangerous than the one in, say, “Call of Duty”
(where we find no children dying).

Kids learn that it is OK to be
competitive and ruthless with each other. The “winner-takes-all” message,
already a trait of our real society, is imprinted even deeper in their
minds.

Unfortunately, it is practically impossible not to cheer and
expect that the heroine will shoot an arrow in the chest of one of the
other kids.

The only good message is the protection of a very
politically correct black girl (who dies anyway and is not black in the
book) by the heroine and the unwillingness to kill the boy for whom she
is attracted to. Kill everybody, except your lover.

OTHERWISE

There is not much to review. The film is boring, the characters have the personality depth of an amoeba and the pace is as slow. The heroine is able to maintain a single facial (lack of) expression for two hours. Almost nothing happens in the first hour. The girl volunteers to fight in the games in the place of her sister. That’s it.

The 24 kids from the oppressed districts head towards the Capitol in order to play in a survival game to death that is broadcast on television for the elites. No drama; no deep discussion about the fairness of the whole thing. Nothing.

Then we have half an hour of a bad parody of the “Predator” movie, with kids killing each other with knives, arrows, spears and blows with a brick to the head.

The heroine climbs trees and runs over streams. Instead of Schwarzenegger and Jesse Ventura, we have pre-teen kids bleeding to death. In order to attract teenager girls, the last half hour has some romance, and obviously, the heroine wins against all odds. That’s it.

So, what makes Hunger Games different from a cheap, badly written and performed B movie ? It has Illuminati sponsorship. The movie was produced to make the new world order weak and ridiculous, so we don’t have to worry about it.

 

 

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