The Mystery of Flight MH370: Looking for Clues in All the Wrong Places

By PAUL YOUNG As we marked the first anniversary of the disappearance of Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 on 8 March 2015, the mystery has demonstrably deepened over time. The lack of substantial news over the past year spawned much speculation – some of it over-imaginative, some of it plausible. If we are willing to disengage […] Continue reading

The Mystique of the Manor: Australia’s Occult Centre Revealed

By PAUL YOUNG Pilgrims have been drawn to the other-worldly auras of hallowed sites, both natural and man-made, all around the globe since antiquity. One such sanctuary sits right in the heart of Sydney and, although it has slipped from prominence today, it played a significant role in Australia’s spiritual and esoteric history. While its […] Continue reading

What Happened to the New Age? Sorting Truth from Nonsense

By RICHARD SMOLEY Not long ago I was walking through the aisles of a New Age fair in the suburbs of Chicago. All the usual suspects were there: booths for Baha’i and Eckankar; ladies selling essences and fragrances; bodyworkers offering ten minutes of chair massage; psychics inspecting the etheric fields of their subjects. Like most […] Continue reading

The NYPD is Spying on Your Cell Phone and It’s Worse Than You Thought

The New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU) has revealed that the New York Police Department has been using cell-site simulators, also known by the brand name Stingray, since at least 2008. This marks the first time the NYPD’s cell phone surveillance program has been made public.

The new documents show the NYPD used the Stingrays over 1,000 times between 2008 and May 2015. They also highlight that the nation’s largest police department has no written policy on the use of cell-site simulators. The police records indicate the devices were typically used in investigations of homicide, assault, kidnapping, drug trafficking, and rape, but were also used to investigate money laundering and identity theft.

Anti-Media has written extensively about how cell-site simulators are being used to track suspected criminals while largely operating without oversight from local, state, or federal authorities. Exactly how the devices operate and what data they collect and/or save has been unknown because of the vast degree of secrecy surrounding the tools.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation describes the Stingray as “a brand name of an IMSI (International Mobile Subscriber Identity) Catcher targeted and sold to law enforcement. A Stingray works by masquerading as a cellphone tower– to which your mobile phone sends signals to every 7 to 15 seconds whether you are on a call or not – and tricks your phone into connecting to it.”

The Harris Corporation, the manufacturer of the Stingray, has maintained a great deal of covertness surrounding these tools. Truth In Media previously reported on documents that revealed the Harris Corp. worked with the Federal Communications Commission to maintain a high level of secrecy.

Donna Lieberman, executive director of the NYCLU, said the privacy of every New Yorker is at risk because of the NYPD’s tactics. “Considering the NYPD’s troubling history of surveilling innocent people, it must at the very least establish strict privacy policies and obtain warrants prior to using intrusive equipment like stingrays that can track people’s cell phones,” Lieberman wrote.

http://theantimedia.org/the-nypd-is-spying-on-your-cell-phone-and-its-worse-than-you-thought/ Continue reading

Quiet ‘Legal Scrub’ Of TPP Makes Massive Change To Penalties For Copyright Infringement Without Telling Anyone

In early November, the “final text” of the TPP was finally released. The USTR even posted the thing to Medium, pretending that after years of secrecy it was now being transparent. As we’ve been told time and time again, the final document is not open to any changes. The only thing left to do was a “legal scrub” which is a final process in which the lawyers comb through the document word by word, basically to make sure there are no typos or out-and-out errors. The legal scrub is not when any substantial changes can be made.

And yet… the eagle eyed Jeremy Malcolm over at EFF has spotted an apparent change in the “legal scrub” of the Intellectual Property chapter that will massively expand criminal penalties for copyright infringing activities that have no impact on the actual market. Technically, the scrub just changed the word “paragraph” to “subparagraph” in the following sentence:

With regard to copyright and related rights piracy provided for under paragraph 1, a Party may limit application of this subparagraph to the cases in which there is an impact on the right holder’s ability to exploit the work, performance or phonogram in the market.

But the impact is massive. As Malcolm explains:

What does this surreptitious change from “paragraph” to “subparagraph” mean? Well, in its original form the provision exempted a country from making available any of the criminal procedures and penalties listed above, except in circumstances where there was an impact on the copyright holder’s ability to exploit their work in the market.

In its revised form, the only criminal provision that a country is exempted from applying in those circumstances is the one to which the footnote is attached—namely, the ex officio action provision. Which means, under this amendment, all of the other criminal procedures and penalties must be available even if the infringement has absolutely no impact on the right holder’s ability to exploit their work in the market. The only enforcement provision that countries have the flexibility to withhold in such cases is the authority

https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20160217/18172633627/quiet-legal-scrub-tpp-makes-massive-change-to-penalties-copyright-infringement-without-telling-anyone.shtml Continue reading